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BCC key partner in new £14m CRUK City of London Centre

Posted in General News, BCI Spotlight Articles Published by Bethan Warman 17 September 2018

BCC key partner in new £14m CRUK City of London Centre

We are delighted to announce that researchers from the BCC will play a leading role in the new Cancer Biotherapeutics Hub launched by CRUK - ‘The CRUK City of London Centre’. The new centre will bring together world-leading cancer researchers from across London - BCC, UCL, KCL and the Francis Crick Institute.

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 14 September 2018

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

A drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis, and prevent organ rejection in transplant patients, has been identified as an important contributor to skin cancer development in a study by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, including our Barts Cancer Research UK Centre (BCC) Bioinformatics team, the University of Dundee and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

VOICE 2018: From bedside to bench

Posted in General News, Engagement Published by Bethan Warman 12 September 2018

VOICE 2018: From bedside to bench

Last week, BCI held the 2018 VOICE (Vision On Information, Confidence & Engagement) course- a study week that aims to take patient advocates from bedside to bench by providing an introduction to basic cancer biology, research terminology and study design. This unique course was developed by Independent Cancer Patients’ Voice (ICPV)- a patient advocate group led by patients for patients- to empower patient advocates and increase their confidence to get involved in the cancer conversation.

‘Chromosomal Catastrophes’ in Colorectal Cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 05 September 2018

‘Chromosomal Catastrophes’ in Colorectal Cancer

Understanding how cancers develop and change over time is a big challenge. For obvious reasons, scientists can’t simply sit and watch a cancer growing in a person. Members of the Evolution and Cancer Laboratory at the BCI, including lead author Dr William Cross, were part of a collaborative team that set out to identify when particular genetic changes arise during bowel cancer development. Their findings, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, indicated that ‘chromosomal catastrophes’ sometimes occur along the evolutionary timeline of colorectal cancer development.

SNPnexus: Assessing the impact of genetic variation

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 30 August 2018

SNPnexus: Assessing the impact of genetic variation

A team of researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Prof Claude Chelala, have made new developments to SNPnexus- a computational tool that allows for the assessment of the functional effect of sequence variants within the genome. The team hope that the new release will facilitate the development of precision medicine, allowing for the identification of effective gene targets for therapy.

Researchers identify new mechanism implicated in lung cancer progression

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 07 August 2018

The impact of LIMD1 loss on tumour growth

Researchers identify new mechanism implicated in lung cancer progression

A new study performed by researchers from BCI led by Dr Tyson Sharp, Lead of the Centre for Molecular Oncology, has identified a novel mechanism implicated in the development of lung adenocarcinoma (the most common type of non-small cell lung cancer), mediated by the loss of a gene called LIMD1. The findings open a new field of research into the cause, diagnosis and prognosis of LIMD1-negative lung cancers and may aid in the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat this disease.

The research, published recently in EMBO Molecular Medicine, highlights a fundamental process in which LIMD1 regulates the cellular response to low oxygen levels, known as hypoxia. Hypoxia is characteristic of most solid tumours, including lung cancer, and is associated with poor patient prognosis as it makes tumours more resistant to therapy.

Pancreatic Cancer UK Grand Challenge

Posted in General News, Grants & Awards Published by Bethan Warman 27 July 2018

PCUK’s largest ever research fund

Pancreatic Cancer UK Grand Challenge

Our Director, Prof Nicholas Lemoine, and a team of researchers from the BCI and King’s College London have been awarded the Pancreatic Cancer UK (PCUK) Grand Challenge- PCUK’s largest ever research fund. The grant will be used for the development of a type of immunotherapy, known as CAR-T cell therapy, to treat pancreatic cancer.

Immunotherapy harnesses the body’s own immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, and has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment option in a variety of cancer types. In CAR-T cell therapy, T cells- key immune cells responsible for fighting infected cells- are isolated from patient blood samples, modified outside of the body and reinjected back into the patient. Once back in the body, the T cells are equipped to target and attack tumours.

CRUK Gibraltar Committee visit the BCI

Posted in General News, Engagement Published by Bethan Warman 18 July 2018

CRUK Gibraltar Committee visit the BCI

We were recently visited by two members of the CRUK Gibraltar Committee, Giovi and Deborah, who came to the BCI for a laboratory tour with Dr Ana Rio-Machin, a postdoctoral researcher in the Centre for Haemato-Oncology. Ana’s research focuses on leukaemia, a type of blood cancer in which patients present an abnormal growth of white blood cells.

Following an introduction to the work that is conducted here to help better understand and treat leukaemia, provided by Ana’s supervisor, Prof Jude Fitzgibbon, Giovi and Deborah visited the laboratories to see where this research takes place.

Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 11 July 2018

Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

A team of researchers from the BCI, led by Prof Trevor Graham, Lead of the Evolution and Cancer Biology Laboratory, have reported the genetic events involved in the early development of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Such knowledge may be able to be exploited to design simple diagnostic tests to stratify patients with IBD at high risk of developing cancer.

IBD more than doubles an individual’s lifetime risk of developing bowel cancer, and the risk increases significantly if they have suffered with IBD for a sustained period of time. With this in mind, the study published today in Gut- performed in collaboration with researchers from St Mark’s Hospital, led by Prof Ailsa Hart, and the University of Oxford, led by Prof Simon Leedham- set out to understand the genetics of how CRC develops in people with IBD.

Prof Trevor Graham part of ‘ACE’ research centre within NCI’s Cancer Systems Biology Consortium

Posted in General News, Grants & Awards Published by Bethan Warman 19 June 2018

Prof Trevor Graham part of ‘ACE’ research centre within NCI’s Cancer Systems Biology Consortium

BCI’s Prof Trevor Graham, Lead of the Evolution and Cancer Biology Laboratory, is part of Arizona State University’s recently funded research centre called ‘ACE’ (the Arizona Cancer Evolution Centre), which has been awarded more than $8.5 million over five years to serve as one of 13 research hubs within the National Cancer Institute (NCI)’s Cancer Systems Biology Consortium (CSBC).

NCI’s CSBC has a multidisciplinary approach, with the network of centres uniting clinical and basic cancer researchers with physical scientists, engineers, mathematicians and computer scientists to tackle key questions in cancer biology in novel ways.

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