News

Updates from BCI

BCIlanyard

Navigate via the main menu, post Categories to the right or Tags below. Join the discussion!

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 February 2018

Tissue banks are a valuable resource for scientists

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

A team of researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London have developed new analytical tools to aid in the analysis of tissue bank (TB) samples, which are an extremely valuable resource for scientists.

Researchers use flu-like virus to attack pancreatic cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 25 January 2018

Researchers use flu-like virus to attack pancreatic cancer

A flu-like virus has now been used in experiments to successfully inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer, according to an early study by researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The study funded by the charity Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund, led by Dr Gunnel Halldén based at the Centre for Molecular Oncology, and including UK colleagues at Cardiff University, suggests that the new technique could potentially become a promising new treatment for patients with the aggressive disease, and could be combined with existing chemotherapy to improve chances of survival.

Steps towards the development of a new immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 23 January 2018

Steps towards the development of a new immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer

A research team led by Professor Yaohe Wang at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has created a novel oncolytic viral agent expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) that shows promise as a potential anti-tumour immunotherapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Using hamster models of pancreatic cancer that closely mimic the stages of tumour development in humans, the study demonstrated that treatment with the virus expressing a modified form of IL-12 could result in up to 100 per cent tumour eradication and survival.

Cost-effective testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 18 January 2018

Cost-effective testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations

Screening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current approach, according to research led by Barts Cancer Institute of Queen Mary University of London.

The researchers believe that implementing a programme to test all British women over 30 years of age could result in thousands of fewer cases of ovarian and breast cancer; up to 17,000 fewer ovarian cancers and 64,000 fewer breast cancers over a lifetime.

Some leukaemia patients may be missing out on new treatments

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 11 January 2018

Some leukaemia patients may be missing out on new treatments

Patients with an aggressive form of leukaemia, currently ineligible for any type of targeted therapy, may in fact benefit from new drugs, according to new research by Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London.

One such drug, named midostaurin, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat this type of leukaemia, but only patients who show mutations on a gene named FLT3 are eligible for treatment.

Tracking treatment-resistant cells in bowel cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Reza Roozitalab 02 January 2018

A powerful new tool for cancer research

Tracking treatment-resistant cells in bowel cancer

Scientists at the BCI have applied a new method to precisely map the location of potentially treatment-resistant mutant cells inside human tumours.

The new method, named BaseScope, allows researchers to see how cells that carry a particular genetic mutation are organised within a tumour. These ‘maps’ of mutant cancer cells (see picture) reveal new information about how tumours grow.

<<  1 2 3 4 5 [6
This site uses cookies in order to function properly. By continuing to browse, you agree that we can save them on your device. Privacy Policy.