Publications

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 14 September 2018

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

A drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis, and prevent organ rejection in transplant patients, has been identified as an important contributor to skin cancer development in a study by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, including our Barts Cancer Research UK Centre (BCC) Bioinformatics team, the University of Dundee and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

‘Chromosomal Catastrophes’ in Colorectal Cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 05 September 2018

‘Chromosomal Catastrophes’ in Colorectal Cancer

Understanding how cancers develop and change over time is a big challenge. For obvious reasons, scientists can’t simply sit and watch a cancer growing in a person. Members of the Evolution and Cancer Laboratory at the BCI, including lead author Dr William Cross, were part of a collaborative team that set out to identify when particular genetic changes arise during bowel cancer development. Their findings, published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, indicated that ‘chromosomal catastrophes’ sometimes occur along the evolutionary timeline of colorectal cancer development.

SNPnexus: Assessing the impact of genetic variation

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 30 August 2018

SNPnexus: Assessing the impact of genetic variation

A team of researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Prof Claude Chelala, have made new developments to SNPnexus- a computational tool that allows for the assessment of the functional effect of sequence variants within the genome. The team hope that the new release will facilitate the development of precision medicine, allowing for the identification of effective gene targets for therapy.

Researchers identify new mechanism implicated in lung cancer progression

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 07 August 2018

The impact of LIMD1 loss on tumour growth

Researchers identify new mechanism implicated in lung cancer progression

A new study performed by researchers from BCI led by Dr Tyson Sharp, Lead of the Centre for Molecular Oncology, has identified a novel mechanism implicated in the development of lung adenocarcinoma (the most common type of non-small cell lung cancer), mediated by the loss of a gene called LIMD1. The findings open a new field of research into the cause, diagnosis and prognosis of LIMD1-negative lung cancers and may aid in the development of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat this disease.

The research, published recently in EMBO Molecular Medicine, highlights a fundamental process in which LIMD1 regulates the cellular response to low oxygen levels, known as hypoxia. Hypoxia is characteristic of most solid tumours, including lung cancer, and is associated with poor patient prognosis as it makes tumours more resistant to therapy.

Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 11 July 2018

Uncovering the evolutionary history of IBD-associated colorectal cancer

A team of researchers from the BCI, led by Prof Trevor Graham, Lead of the Evolution and Cancer Biology Laboratory, have reported the genetic events involved in the early development of bowel cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Such knowledge may be able to be exploited to design simple diagnostic tests to stratify patients with IBD at high risk of developing cancer.

IBD more than doubles an individual’s lifetime risk of developing bowel cancer, and the risk increases significantly if they have suffered with IBD for a sustained period of time. With this in mind, the study published today in Gut- performed in collaboration with researchers from St Mark’s Hospital, led by Prof Ailsa Hart, and the University of Oxford, led by Prof Simon Leedham- set out to understand the genetics of how CRC develops in people with IBD.

Research explainer: Mis-segregation of human chromosomes

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 13 June 2018

Research explainer: Mis-segregation of human chromosomes

Dr Sarah McClelland from Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, has recently published new research in the journal Cell Reports revealing new insights into why cell division can sometimes go wrong.

In this Q & A, she explains why chromosomes can end up in the wrong places when dividing and highlights two particular chromosomes that seem to be more prone to the issue than others.

Research suggests improved detection rates are needed to maximise cancer prevention

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 08 June 2018

Research suggests improved detection rates are needed to maximise cancer prevention

Current detection strategies are found to have identified only 2.6% of the BRCA gene mutation carriers in the Greater London population, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Medical genetics. The findings of the study, performed by researchers from the BCI’s Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine, led by Dr Ranjit Manchanda, suggest that enhanced and new approaches are required to maximise the opportunity for breast and ovarian cancer prevention.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A recent study has shown that about 72 and 69% of women who inherit a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, develop breast cancer by 80 years of age. Additionally, 44 and 17% of women who inherit a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, develop ovarian cancer by 80 years of age. Identifying mutation carriers is therefore critical to reduce the number of BRCA-associated cancers.

Forecasting the evolution of cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 28 May 2018

Predicting the trajectory of tumour growth

Forecasting the evolution of cancer

New research, published today in Nature Genetics, has developed a computer model that forecasts the changes that occur within tumours as they develop. In the future, it is hoped that such a model may enable the prediction of the trajectory of tumour growth in patients, allowing clinicians to pre-empt disease course and tailor treatment regimens accordingly.

The model was developed in collaboration with researchers from BCI’s Centre for Tumour Biology, led by Prof Trevor Graham (Lead for the Evolutionary and Cancer Biology Laboratory), the Institute of Cancer Research, led by Dr Andrea Sottoriva, and University College London, led by Dr Chris Barnes.

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 May 2018

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

The breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumours can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study published in eLife. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment options and drug design in the future.

Lapatinib is used in combination with other cancer drugs and chemotherapy to treat patients with a particular type of advanced breast cancer, but failed clinical trials as a stand-alone treatment.

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 April 2018

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Dr Gunnel Halldén, have identified a mechanism by which a modified flu-like virus, called AdDD, is able to negate resistance to a drug called mitoxantrone and increase tumour cell killing in prostate cancer models. This mechanism is dependent on B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)- a protein involved in the regulation of cell death (apoptosis).

Recent statistics have shown that prostate cancer is now the third biggest cancer killer in the UK, claiming the life of one man every 45 minutes. Here at the BCI, prostate cancer is a key focus of research and our researchers endeavour to identify factors that influence prostate cancer progression and therapeutic response.

[12 3  >>  
This site uses cookies in order to function properly. By continuing to browse, you agree that we can save them on your device. Privacy Policy.