Publications

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 May 2018

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

The breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumours can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study published in eLife. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment options and drug design in the future.

Lapatinib is used in combination with other cancer drugs and chemotherapy to treat patients with a particular type of advanced breast cancer, but failed clinical trials as a stand-alone treatment.

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 April 2018

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Dr Gunnel Halldén, have identified a mechanism by which a modified flu-like virus, called AdDD, is able to negate resistance to a drug called mitoxantrone and increase tumour cell killing in prostate cancer models. This mechanism is dependent on B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)- a protein involved in the regulation of cell death (apoptosis).

Recent statistics have shown that prostate cancer is now the third biggest cancer killer in the UK, claiming the life of one man every 45 minutes. Here at the BCI, prostate cancer is a key focus of research and our researchers endeavour to identify factors that influence prostate cancer progression and therapeutic response.

BCI and KCL collaboration develops a clinically-relevant CAR T cell imaging system

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 19 April 2018

BCI and KCL collaboration develops a clinically-relevant CAR T cell imaging system

A collaboration involving researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Dr Jane Sosabowski, and the ImmunoEngineering Group of King’s College London (KCL), led by Dr Sophie Papa, has developed an effective and clinically-relevant imaging system to monitor chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells within the body. This system reduced the tumour burden in a pre-clinical model of prostate cancer and allowed for repeated and non-invasive assessment of CAR T cell localisation.

Determining the mechanisms of response and resistance to treatment in bladder cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 29 March 2018

Improving the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors

Determining the mechanisms of response and resistance to treatment in bladder cancer

A worldwide collaboration involving BCI’s Prof Thomas Powles, Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine, has revealed mechanisms involved in the development of response and resistance to an immune checkpoint inhibitor in metastatic urothelial cancer. The findings may highlight ways to improve the efficacy of this treatment in the hope of achieving long-term remission for patients.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapeutic drug, have been shown to induce robust responses in patients with a variety of cancer types. These drugs block proteins that prevent the immune system from destroying cancer cells.

Follicular lymphoma marked by spatial tumour heterogeneity

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 23 March 2018

A challenge for targeted therapy

Follicular lymphoma marked by spatial tumour heterogeneity

A research team at the BCI, Queen Mary University of London, led by Dr Jessica Okosun, Centre for Haemato-Oncology, has found that tumours at different sites within the same patient with follicular lymphoma can be genetically diverse. This suggests that a sole biopsy is incapable of capturing all the genetic events in any given individual and presents a significant challenge when providing targeted therapies to treat this disease.

Follicular lymphoma is an incurable blood cancer that is characterised by the production of abnormal B lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell involved in fighting infection) that accumulate primarily in the lymph nodes and bone marrow. Approximately 2,300 cases of follicular lymphoma are diagnosed in the UK each year.

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 February 2018

Resistance to receptor tyrosine kinase-targeted therapies

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, led by Dr Richard Grose, Centre for Tumour Biology, have discovered that the loss of a single protein- PHLDA1- is sufficient for the development of drug resistance to a type of targeted therapy in endometrial and HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

Drugs that target specific pathways in cancer cells- so called targeted therapies- offer promising clinical benefits for cancer patients, with less severe side effects compared with more conventional chemotherapy agents. However, drug resistance- whereby cancer cells find ways to evade the effects of these drugs over time- limits the long-term clinical efficacy of these treatments.

The involvement of the microenvironment in tumour evolution

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 15 February 2018

Understanding the relationship between tumours and their environment

The involvement of the microenvironment in tumour evolution

For the first time, researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, have profiled what happens at the site of tumour metastasis as cancer grows and develops. By looking closely at the tumour microenvironment (TME), the team led by Professor Fran Balkwill, Lead for the Centre for Cancer & Inflammation, has identified changes that occur as a type of ovarian cancer evolves.

By analysing samples from the omentum- the most common site for cancer spread in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC)- from 36 women with differing degrees of disease severity, the team have gained a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tumours and their environment during the progression of this type of ovarian cancer.

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 February 2018

Tissue banks are a valuable resource for scientists

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

A team of researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London have developed new analytical tools to aid in the analysis of tissue bank (TB) samples, which are an extremely valuable resource for scientists.

Researchers use flu-like virus to attack pancreatic cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 25 January 2018

Researchers use flu-like virus to attack pancreatic cancer

A flu-like virus has now been used in experiments to successfully inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancer, according to an early study by researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The study funded by the charity Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund, led by Dr Gunnel Halldén based at the Centre for Molecular Oncology, and including UK colleagues at Cardiff University, suggests that the new technique could potentially become a promising new treatment for patients with the aggressive disease, and could be combined with existing chemotherapy to improve chances of survival.

Steps towards the development of a new immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 23 January 2018

Steps towards the development of a new immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer

A research team led by Professor Yaohe Wang at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) has created a novel oncolytic viral agent expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) that shows promise as a potential anti-tumour immunotherapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Using hamster models of pancreatic cancer that closely mimic the stages of tumour development in humans, the study demonstrated that treatment with the virus expressing a modified form of IL-12 could result in up to 100 per cent tumour eradication and survival.

[12  >>  
This site uses cookies in order to function properly. By continuing to browse, you agree that we can save them on your device. Privacy Policy.