Articles tagged with: Breast

‘The neighbouring effect’: Centrosomal abnormalities drive invasion of surrounding cells

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 19 November 2018

‘The neighbouring effect’: Centrosomal abnormalities drive invasion of surrounding cells

Centrosomal amplification, a particular change that occurs within some cancer cells, has been shown to drive the invasion of neighbouring cancer cells in a recent study by researchers from the BCI, led by Dr Susana Godinho, and the Francis Crick Institute.

New trial using combination therapy extends survival in triple-negative breast cancer

Posted in General News, BCI on the Road, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 22 October 2018

New trial using combination therapy extends survival in triple-negative breast cancer

New research led by Barts Cancer Institute and St Bartholomew’s Hospital has provided new hope for people with an aggressive type of breast cancer. The phase 3 clinical trial has shown that by using a combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy, the body’s own immune system can be tuned to attack triple-negative breast cancer, extending survival by up to ten months.

Immunotherapy shows promise for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 17 October 2018

Immunotherapy shows promise for patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer

Immunotherapy has been shown to confer an encouraging survival benefit in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC). The phase 1 clinical trial, led by Prof Peter Schmid, Centre Lead for BCI’s Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine, is the first to report the long-term safety and efficacy of the drug for mTNBC, and may represent significant steps forward for treatment of this disease.

Research suggests improved detection rates are needed to maximise cancer prevention

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 08 June 2018

Research suggests improved detection rates are needed to maximise cancer prevention

Current detection strategies are found to have identified only 2.6% of the BRCA gene mutation carriers in the Greater London population, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Medical genetics. The findings of the study, performed by researchers from the BCI’s Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine, led by Dr Ranjit Manchanda, suggest that enhanced and new approaches are required to maximise the opportunity for breast and ovarian cancer prevention.

BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are associated with an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. A recent study has shown that about 72 and 69% of women who inherit a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, develop breast cancer by 80 years of age. Additionally, 44 and 17% of women who inherit a harmful mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, respectively, develop ovarian cancer by 80 years of age. Identifying mutation carriers is therefore critical to reduce the number of BRCA-associated cancers.

International Clinical Trials Day 2018

Posted in General News Published by Bethan Warman 21 May 2018

International Clinical Trials Day 2018

International Clinical Trials Day is celebrated on 20th May each year in recognition of the clinical trials conducted around the world, which ensure that research from the laboratory can be translated into patient benefit. The progress that is continuing to be made in cancer research, resulting in cancer survival rates doubling in the last 40 years, would not be possible without the researchers, clinicians, nurses and, of course, patients that are involved in clinical trials each year.

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 May 2018

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

The breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumours can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study published in eLife. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment options and drug design in the future.

Lapatinib is used in combination with other cancer drugs and chemotherapy to treat patients with a particular type of advanced breast cancer, but failed clinical trials as a stand-alone treatment.

Seema Jaswal visits the BCI

Posted in General News, Engagement Published by Bethan Warman 15 March 2018

Celebrating International Women's Day

Seema Jaswal visits the BCI

Last Thursday was International Women’s Day- a day that celebrates the social, political, cultural and economic achievements of women from all over the world. Recently, an inspirational woman, Seema Jaswal- a television and radio presenter- visited us here at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) to meet some of our researchers and find out more about the cutting edge research that goes on here.

Seema’s TV career began at Sky Sports where she worked as a Runner before receiving her first presenting job on CBBC Sports Round. Seema’s successful career has since seen her host a variety of events, including the Indian Super League, India’s FIFA U17 World Cup and the Premier League. Last year, Seema was named as one of We Are The City’s Inspirational Women.

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 February 2018

Resistance to receptor tyrosine kinase-targeted therapies

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, led by Dr Richard Grose, Centre for Tumour Biology, have discovered that the loss of a single protein- PHLDA1- is sufficient for the development of drug resistance to a type of targeted therapy in endometrial and HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

Drugs that target specific pathways in cancer cells- so called targeted therapies- offer promising clinical benefits for cancer patients, with less severe side effects compared with more conventional chemotherapy agents. However, drug resistance- whereby cancer cells find ways to evade the effects of these drugs over time- limits the long-term clinical efficacy of these treatments.

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 February 2018

Tissue banks are a valuable resource for scientists

Staying connected: New developments for tissue banking bioinformatics

A team of researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI) of Queen Mary University of London have developed new analytical tools to aid in the analysis of tissue bank (TB) samples, which are an extremely valuable resource for scientists.

Cost-effective testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 18 January 2018

Cost-effective testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations

Screening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current approach, according to research led by Barts Cancer Institute of Queen Mary University of London.

The researchers believe that implementing a programme to test all British women over 30 years of age could result in thousands of fewer cases of ovarian and breast cancer; up to 17,000 fewer ovarian cancers and 64,000 fewer breast cancers over a lifetime.

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