Articles tagged with: Drugs

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 14 September 2018

Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

A drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis, and prevent organ rejection in transplant patients, has been identified as an important contributor to skin cancer development in a study by researchers from Queen Mary University of London, including our Barts Cancer Research UK Centre (BCC) Bioinformatics team, the University of Dundee and the Wellcome Sanger Institute.

Pancreatic Cancer UK Grand Challenge

Posted in General News, Grants & Awards Published by Bethan Warman 27 July 2018

PCUK’s largest ever research fund

Pancreatic Cancer UK Grand Challenge

Our Director, Prof Nicholas Lemoine, and a team of researchers from the BCI and King’s College London have been awarded the Pancreatic Cancer UK (PCUK) Grand Challenge- PCUK’s largest ever research fund. The grant will be used for the development of a type of immunotherapy, known as CAR-T cell therapy, to treat pancreatic cancer.

Immunotherapy harnesses the body’s own immune system to identify and kill cancer cells, and has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment option in a variety of cancer types. In CAR-T cell therapy, T cells- key immune cells responsible for fighting infected cells- are isolated from patient blood samples, modified outside of the body and reinjected back into the patient. Once back in the body, the T cells are equipped to target and attack tumours.

BCI at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting: Results from the PAKT and ABACUS trials

Posted in General News, Conferences, BCI on the Road Published by Bethan Warman 15 June 2018

BCI at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting: Results from the PAKT and ABACUS trials

Professors Peter Schmid and Thomas Powles attended this year’s ASCO Annual Meeting, which took place from 1st-5th June in Chicago. The Centre Lead of our Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine (CECM), Prof Schmid, presented data from the PAKT trial- a trial investigating the addition of a novel drug called AZD5363 to a standard chemotherapy regimen as a treatment for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Prof Powles of the CECM and Director of the Barts Cancer Centre, presented results from the ABACUS trial, which is investigating the efficacy and safety of a drug called atezolizumab administered prior to cystectomy in muscle invasive bladder cancer. The ABACUS trial was selected as one of the highlights of this year’s meeting.

International Clinical Trials Day 2018

Posted in General News Published by Bethan Warman 21 May 2018

International Clinical Trials Day 2018

International Clinical Trials Day is celebrated on 20th May each year in recognition of the clinical trials conducted around the world, which ensure that research from the laboratory can be translated into patient benefit. The progress that is continuing to be made in cancer research, resulting in cancer survival rates doubling in the last 40 years, would not be possible without the researchers, clinicians, nurses and, of course, patients that are involved in clinical trials each year.

London Pancreas Workshop 2018

Posted in General News, BCI Spotlight Articles, Events Published by Bethan Warman 11 May 2018

A forum for state-of-the-art clinical and basic research in pancreatic cancer

London Pancreas Workshop 2018

On Friday 4th May, BCI hosted the seventh London Pancreas Workshop, co-organised by Prof Hemant Kocher and our Director Prof Nick Lemoine, which attracted delegates from across Europe and America, with over 140 attendees in total. The biennial event is recognised as a forum for state-of-the-art clinical and basic research in pancreatic cancer.

The areas of focus for this year’s workshop were diagnostics, clinical trials and preclinical work for targeting pancreatic cancer. We heard a variety of interesting talks in these areas, delivered by researchers renowned in their fields.

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 01 May 2018

Research reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growth

The breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumours can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study published in eLife. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment options and drug design in the future.

Lapatinib is used in combination with other cancer drugs and chemotherapy to treat patients with a particular type of advanced breast cancer, but failed clinical trials as a stand-alone treatment.

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 April 2018

Using a modified adenovirus to overcome treatment resistance in prostate cancer

Researchers from BCI’s Centre for Molecular Oncology, led by Dr Gunnel Halldén, have identified a mechanism by which a modified flu-like virus, called AdDD, is able to negate resistance to a drug called mitoxantrone and increase tumour cell killing in prostate cancer models. This mechanism is dependent on B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)- a protein involved in the regulation of cell death (apoptosis).

Recent statistics have shown that prostate cancer is now the third biggest cancer killer in the UK, claiming the life of one man every 45 minutes. Here at the BCI, prostate cancer is a key focus of research and our researchers endeavour to identify factors that influence prostate cancer progression and therapeutic response.

Determining the mechanisms of response and resistance to treatment in bladder cancer

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 29 March 2018

Improving the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors

Determining the mechanisms of response and resistance to treatment in bladder cancer

A worldwide collaboration involving BCI’s Prof Thomas Powles, Centre for Experimental Cancer Medicine, has revealed mechanisms involved in the development of response and resistance to an immune checkpoint inhibitor in metastatic urothelial cancer. The findings may highlight ways to improve the efficacy of this treatment in the hope of achieving long-term remission for patients.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors, a class of immunotherapeutic drug, have been shown to induce robust responses in patients with a variety of cancer types. These drugs block proteins that prevent the immune system from destroying cancer cells.

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 27 February 2018

Resistance to receptor tyrosine kinase-targeted therapies

Switching on survival signalling to drive drug resistance

Researchers at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI), Queen Mary University of London, led by Dr Richard Grose, Centre for Tumour Biology, have discovered that the loss of a single protein- PHLDA1- is sufficient for the development of drug resistance to a type of targeted therapy in endometrial and HER2-positive breast cancer cells.

Drugs that target specific pathways in cancer cells- so called targeted therapies- offer promising clinical benefits for cancer patients, with less severe side effects compared with more conventional chemotherapy agents. However, drug resistance- whereby cancer cells find ways to evade the effects of these drugs over time- limits the long-term clinical efficacy of these treatments.

Some leukaemia patients may be missing out on new treatments

Posted in General News, Publications Published by Bethan Warman 11 January 2018

Some leukaemia patients may be missing out on new treatments

Patients with an aggressive form of leukaemia, currently ineligible for any type of targeted therapy, may in fact benefit from new drugs, according to new research by Barts Cancer Institute at Queen Mary University of London.

One such drug, named midostaurin, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat this type of leukaemia, but only patients who show mutations on a gene named FLT3 are eligible for treatment.

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